National Coal Miner’s Day is observed every year on 4 May to highlight the contributions of coal miners in meeting our energy demands. Coal mining is a hazardous profession. There were several instances of mining accidents reported. The miners also face the risk of respiratory illness due to the conditions of their work. They work under the Earth’s crust.

Coal has been mined since ancient Roman times, but it has become a major energy source only since the Industrial Revolution. Coal is both the largest source of electricity generation and the largest single source of CO2 emissions, creating a unique challenge in transitioning to low-carbon energy systems. Coal plays a crucial role in industries such as iron and steel. Coal is also an important ingredient in the creation of methanol which turns up in such items as plywood (binding resin) and plastic bottles (acetic acid).

India has the world’s third-largest hard coal reserves, after the United States and China. India is also the third largest coal producer in the world and the eighth largest importer. With annual production of 310 million tonnes and imports of almost 25 million tonnes, coal provides one-third of energy supply in India. Over 90% of the coal supply is indigenous production. Coal consumption has been growing at about 4.8% per year, and this rate is expected to increase in the future.

Coal India Ltd is the world’s second-largest coal supplier, after the Russian mining company Rosugol, and produces about 86% of total production of Coal in India and Singareni Collieries Company Ltd produces 8%. Dhanbad in Jharkhand is called “The Coal Capital of India” , because of the richness of coal.

Coal Miner’s

Mineworkers face a constantly changing combination of workplace circumstances. Some work in an atmosphere without natural light or ventilation, creating voids in the earth by removing material and trying to ensure that there will be no immediate reaction from the surrounding strata. Despite the efforts in many countries, the toll of death, injury and disease among the world’s mineworkers means that, in most countries, mining remains the most hazardous occupation when the number of people exposed to risk is taken into account.
Although only accounting for one percent of the global workforce, it is responsible for about eight percent of fatal accidents at work. No reliable data exist on injuries, but they are significant, as is the number of workers affected by such disabling occupational diseases as pneumoconiosis, hearing loss and the effects of vibration. Coal India Limited along with its seven coal-producing subsidiaries had a total workforce of some 562 000 employees, making it the world’s second-largest employer after General Motors. This excludes indirect workers.Coal India Limited along with its seven coal-producing subsidiaries had a total workforce of some 562 000 employees, making it the world’s second-largest employer after General Motors. This excludes indirect workers.

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